Knowledge for better food systems

Showing results for: Mitigation policies

10 January 2012

The Soil Association and the World Society for the Protection of Animals have published a report on anaerobic digestion (biogas) arguing the environmental  benefits of  large-scale AD units are questionable and may even be damaging.

6 December 2011

The UK Government’s Carbon Plan was published in December 2011. It sets out how government’s proposals and policies for meeting the first four carbon budgets - legally binding limits on the amount of emissions that may be produced in successive five-year periods, beginning in 2008.

28 November 2011

This study, led by the University of British Columbia shows how the effects of climate change can impact the profitability of fisheries. A key conclusion is that Governments should plan and anticipate, rather than react to the potential negative impacts of climate change on the economic viability of current fisheries practices.

28 November 2011

Timed to coincide with the UN climate convention negotiations in South Africa, this study by UNEP argues that the world has the technological and economic solutions to avert climate change.

18 November 2011

The November edition of the Livestock Exchange brief by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) explored ‘Livestock and Climate Change’.  Philip Thornton, Mario Herrero and Polly Ericksen prepared an issue brief on the relations between climate change and livestock systems in developing countries.

18 November 2011

In June 2011, Arla Foods launched its Global Environmental Strategy 2020, which maps the entire environmental impact of its dairy products and includes a pledge to reduce global CO2 emissions by 25% by 2020 within the areas of production, haulage and packaging.

23 February 2011

WWF has released its Livewell report, that looks at whether it is possible to eat a diet that is both lower in GHG emissions and more nutritionally balanced than current dietary norms in the UK.

1 May 2007

The Stern Review examines the financial, human and other costs of failing to tackle climate change and concludes that this could amount to trillions of pounds, equivalent to shrinking the global economy by a fifth by 2050.

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