Knowledge for better food systems

World Bank blog-post: Greenhouse gas accounting: A step forward for climate-smart agriculture

In this blog-post Ademola Braimoh, Senior Natural Resources Management Specialist, at the World Bank, argues that quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production is a necessary step for climate-smart agriculture (CSA). He writes that greenhouse gas accounting can provide the numbers and data that are important for solid decision making.

In this blog-post Ademola Braimoh, Senior Natural Resources Management Specialist, at the World Bank, argues that quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production is a necessary step for climate-smart agriculture (CSA). He writes that greenhouse gas accounting can provide the numbers and data that are important for solid decision making.

The blog-post also highlights the launch of a new on-line course developed by a production team at the World Bank and FAO, with the support of Institut de Recherche pour le Développement -IRD. The e-Course contains 3-4 hours of online learning, and has 3 modules:

  • Module 1: AFOLU and Climate Change
  • Module 2: Step-by-Step Guide to EX-ACT
  • Module 3: Applications

Take a look at the FAO website for more information.  

Read the full blog-post here.

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blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/greenhouse-gas-accounting-step-forward-climate-smart-agriculture

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While some of the food system challenges facing humanity are local, in an interconnected world, adopting a global perspective is essential. Many environmental issues, such as climate change, need supranational commitments and action to be addressed effectively. Due to ever increasing global trade flows, prices of commodities are connected through space; a drought in Romania may thus increase the price of wheat in Zimbabwe.

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